Responsibility of being Healed.

Found this devo-article on Relevant Magazine this morning: “Do you want to be healed”.

In talking about responding to dumb questions, writer Jordan Davis, discusses a seemingly dumb question Jesus asked a lame man in John 5.  Here’s part of the devo; to read all of it, go here:

One such story is found in the fifth chapter of John. You may have heard sermons preached on this passage. You may have even read this story yourself. Often this story is referred to as “The Healing at the Pool” or “Jesus Heals a Lame Man.”

To begin with, this man was lame. And lame, in biblical times, wasn’t a way of saying he wasn’t cool. It means, in the most literal sense, this man could not walk. We discover he had been this way for 38 years. I don’t believe wheelchairs had been invented yet. That means this man was dependent on the mercy of others.

We also find out he spent most of his time lying by the pool; however, he wasn’t looking for a tan. He was hoping to be healed. And according to legend, this pool—the Pool of Bethesda—was known for its healing powers. The Bible tells us an angel would stir the waters of the pool at any random time and heal the first to enter. Every time the water was stirred, though, this lame man was pushed aside by those less lame (literally and figuratively).

But today will be different. Enter Jesus.

Jesus opened His mouth and uttered what can only seem like one of those dumb questions I referred to earlier.  “Do you want to get well?”

Talk about a dumb question—every time I read this, I wonder what in the world Jesus was thinking. Then my mind wanders to the lame man, and I put myself in his shoes—er, I mean sandals. And I can’t help but think that after laying there day in and day out, this man would have made some smart remark.

“No, Jesus, I can actually walk. My friends and family just carry me here so I can pick up the ladies. The sympathy card works wonders! … Of course I want to be healed. I can’t walk! I’ve been this way for 38 years!”

I tend to think there was more going on here than meets the eye. Given the fact that Jesus is God in the flesh and that circumstances made the answer to His question quite obvious, I can only conclude Jesus was talking about something not-so-obvious. You see, God doesn’t ask us questions because He lacks information. He’s omniscient.

Let’s try to unpack this question by looking at it in a different light. Perhaps Jesus was digging deeper and asking things like: Do you really want things to change? Are you ready to leave behind all of the excuses? Can you handle the responsibilities that will become a regular part of your life now?

Being healed changes everything. Sometimes our healing comes with a price tag. The question then becomes, Are we willing to pay the cost? Are we willing to do what it takes? Often, I wonder if we want to be healed but aren’t ready for the change that it brings.

Believe it or not, there are many people who do not want to be healed. Their ailments (physical, mental and emotional) have come to define them. They do not want divine help with their problems. They do not want to be helped out of their weakness. They are used to thriving on the sympathy and pity of others. They sometimes flee from assuming responsibility for their own lives. People will openly turn their backs on the deliverance offered them, all because of the responsibility that will come with it.

To read this entire devo, go here.

With every healing comes responsibility.  What is this responsibility?  To live in the reality that Christ is your everything.  That no matter what path healing brings you, the journey before you belongs to Him and it’s for Him that you walk – in faith.  As Acts 17:28 hits home: “… for in Him we live and move and exist … “.

Here are other thoughts on prayer, faith, and following after God’s heart:

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2 responses to “Responsibility of being Healed.

  1. When I have talked about this passage with friends who also have disabilities, they tend to lock on to the number of years that this fellow has missed the opportunities for healing. And they tend to wonder, indeed, whether really he wants to be well, because it seems like he might be copping out in some way and playing the victim card. To be sure, we all know people who have been dealt problem after problem after problem, but it seems important to do whatever we can to participate in the healing event. And sometimes, even though we do want to be well, we are afraid to make the move, whatever it might be. We also have a tendency for some reason to stick with what’s familiar, even if it’s painful or unproductive, just because it’s familiar. We’d rather “dance with a devil we know than with one we don’t know.” It’s kind of a shame, isn’t it?

  2. When I talk about this passage with friends who also have disabilities, they tend to lock on to the number of years that this fellow kept missing his opportunities for healing. And they wonder, indeed, whether or not he wants to be healed, because it seems like he might be copping out in some way and playing the victim card. We all know people who have been dealt hardship after hardship after hardship, and we can’t really blame them for wanting to give up at times. Nevertheless, it seems important to do our part (whatever it may be) to make the healing happen. Sometimes we are afraid, for some reason, to make the required move. And we also have a tendency to stick with what’s familiar, even if it’s unproductive or even painful, just because it’s familiar. We’d rather “dance with a devil we know than one we don’t know.” It kind of a shame, isn’t it?

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